Go From Bland To Unique With Mexican Talavera Tile In Your Home

talavera_tilesMexican Talavera Tiles mainly get their inspiration from the culture and history of Mexico. You can find many different types of tiles that all have a specific, unique design on them. The options that you have are limitless, as long as you have enough room for that much tile. With the options that you have, you can either go for hand painted and crafted, or you can purchase them factory made. The factory made tiles are generally less expensive than the hand crafted tiles.

The most popular type of Mexican tile are the ones that are hand crafted, although you also have the option of purchasing factory made tiles. The tile is generally a terracotta tile or ceramic tile that is painted with a unique Mexican design. There are many different types of Mexican tiles, although the most widely used are the hand painted ones such as Talavera tiles and Saltillo tiles.

Mexican Tiles That Are Hand Crafted – You might be wondering what is so special about hand crafted tiles. First of all, you will be receiving a unique style that could never be produced in a factory setting. When you choose to go with hand painted tiles, you are buying something that has so much beauty and character that a factory could never compare. The design that is painted on the tiles depends on culture.

The greatest advantage that you will get from using Mexican tile in your home is the ability to capture the Mexican culture. This is the main reason why hand painted and hand crafted Mexican tiles are so desirable. You can use their design to bring out the rustic Mexican heritage in your home.

Talavera Mexican Tiles – Talavera tiles are considered the most popular type of Mexican tile that there is. These are the tiles that have bright designs and colors that you would find in bathrooms, sinks, kitchens, stairs and backsplashes. When placed together, these ceramic tiles can come in geometrical and symmetrical designs that can create amazing patterns.

The most interesting fact about these tiles is the reasoning behind their design. These tiles are meant to have small flaws, which helps to bring out their rustic appearance and setting. The color of the finish or paint may have small imperfections that help to bring out the Mexican design and culture. The most common size of these tiles is 4×4, but they have also been seen in larger and smaller sizes.

The most amazing thing about using Mexican tiles is that to some extent, the designs and colors will never be the same as another set of tiles. They are unique in their own way and show just how artistic the Mexican culture is. Even if you purchasing plain, solid colored Mexican tiles, they are still able to capture the rustic heritage of Mexican\’s. It doesn\’t matter whether you are searching for the right type of hand painted tiles, Talavera tiles to use in your sinks or on your walls, or you would prefer Saltillo tiles to use outdoors for your patio, you will be able to capture the Mexican culture in your home.

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Spruce Up Your Home with Authentic Talavera Pottery

Authentic Talavera from MexicoThis year get creative and choose gifts to delight everyone on your list and be remember for this unique piece of art.

You will find something unique for your friends and family that they will appreciate you for it, because it will change the look in any room of thier home.

Talavera decorative pieces will enhance any room of any home lacking in liveliness as to cause mental weariness.

Talavera pottery comes in inexhaustible shapes, colors and forms making it one of the most versatile workings of art, which makes it uncomplicated to appeal to a variety of taste.

There is a such wide variety to choose from that while you are determining what to buy, you will most likely have a harder time deciding which pieces to keep for yourself and which ones to give as gifts.

Talavera is furthermore a brilliant option for home remodeling projects, you can transform your kitchen with tiles, murals, floor tiles, cooking ware, wall plates, and dishes.

If you are thinking about your bathroom, you have talavera sinks, mirrors, and bathroom accessories.

You also can convert the look and feel of your dinning space, living-room, bedroom, and floors, here is no end to the many ways you can fix up and change the look in your household.

After you get a Talavera pottery piece, you are in possession of a part of fine art that has a rich history and a tradition going back to the 16Th century after it was formerly introduced by the Conquistadors to the Nueva Espana.

The indigenous people who learned the old techniques added their own themes, colors and shapes, which gave birth to the pottery that we see today.

When you look at a Talavera vase, jar, urn, platter, plate, bath accessories, and tiles you will notice the influence of the different cultures; Arab, Spanish, Chinese, Italian, and Mexican that where involved in the evolution of this world-renowned art that had a great influence throughout the newly discover world.

Due to due to its functionality and durability in every day use, Talavera pottery became popular in the 19Th century and in many cases a Talavera piece would become a legacy within a family, passing from one generation to the next one. Today, this can also be true, you can start a little legacy for you, or someone that you know.

In our day, this will also will hold to be true, you can start a minor legacy of your own, or someone that you know.

This year give out extra significance with less expenses with a piece of hand painted Talavera pottery, the finest earthenware of Mexico.

The Pride of Mexico: Talavera Pottery

Talavera Ginger Jar by Maximo HuertaWe live in a world where technology, Internet and LCD screens are everyday conversation. But some people like to take us a break and enjoy the simple things that have been with us for many centuries. In Mexico we are very proud of our Mexican pottery

The pottery was used by our ancestors for everyday use, but also as part of their religious rites. So we can find a wide variety of ways, because although they could be used to bring water, were also placed proudly in the center of the ceremonies that took place.

An authentic pottery is made entirely by hand, using techniques that our ancestors discovered and that even today are passed by tradition from grandfather to childs. While today are manufactured in serie the fake ceramic, for do a real ceramic is required about a month of work.

Clay usually used for processing, so we can ensure a very strong product that will stand the test of time. Originally this material was used to keep water cool, then before the intense heat of this country, they had a way to maintain a good temperature this vital liquid.

The crafts used for daily use are usually brown, keeping the color of the earth. But for decorating the home is unusual to keep that color, it is common that is decorated with colors that give it new life.

There are different types of Mexican pottery throughout the country, each region has its own style that characterizes it. For example, there Talavera Puebla, which is valued worldwide for its beauty and level of complexity in their development.

If you come to Mexico, you can visit the many states out there. Everyone has their own style, so you probably end up finding something according to your tastes and needs. We have crafts of all sizes and colors for your home.

In conclusion, in Mexico we are very proud of our ceramics. Has a unique globally which is prized by people who know art. Do not be fooled by imitations, the real is reality by craftsmen who are still using ancient methods.

Talavera: An Essential Component in a Southwest Mexican Home

When creating a southwest Mexican rustic home decor, talavera pottery can add a gorgeous finishing touch. Talavera pottery plays an important role in Mexican decor because of the unique styles, colors and designs of each creation. Your home will be the talk of the neighborhood and no one has to know you didn’t pay a fortune. Here’s some information about talavera pottery and ways you can use it for home decoration.

Authentic Talavera PlateWhat is Talavera Pottery?

Talavera pottery is created with majolica earthenware, which is a type of ceramic that is glazed and white in color. The pottery was introduced to Mexico by Spaniards. It is used to decorate many patios, commercial and residential buildings, social and business squares, and even homes in Mexico.

A city in Mexico called Puebla was established in 1531 and almost immediately became the center of earthenware production. Today, the pottery is still being made with the same techniques that were used during the 16th Century, and it is the oldest tin-glazed ceramic in America.

Talavera Products for Home Decor

When shopping for talavera pottery, you must think out of the box. Look around for a variety of products, such as talavera plates, jars, pots, vases and religious figurines. You can create a southwestern decor in every room of your home using various types of pottery. Talavera pottery can be placed in room corners on the floor or next to pieces of equipal furniture such as sofas, chairs or floor lamps. Add Talavera plates to your kitchen hutch or China cabinet display along with Mexican glassware (such as blue rim margarita drinking glasses).

On the patio, use colorful outdoor equipal patio furniture along with talavera planting pots. These look lovely on wood, brick or stone patios…whatever fits your style. Hang a relaxing hammock nearby and complete your yard decor with matching bird feeders and birdhouses, garden statues (with Mexican flare), fountains and stepping-stones!

Buy pottery products to match your other southwest home decor items in color and theme. This will give every room a true southwest Mexican rustic home decor. You can buy authentic or imitation talavera pottery. Either way, make sure you’re getting quality items and buy only from a reputable retailer. There are many websites offering pottery, but beware of those that don’t guarantee the quality of their products. Also, look for other great items such as rustic sconce light covers and Mexican tin mirrors. These make great gifts for anyone that appreciates Mexican decor. You’ll want a beautifully crafted piece that will last for many years!

Talavera Pottery

Talavera Plate by Studio La CupulaTalavera Poblana is an exquisite type of pottery whose history goes back hundreds of years. The lovely and beautiful colonial city of Puebla, located just 70 miles from Mexico City, is home to this world-renowned art form. In addition to purchasing authentic Talavera pottery in Puebla, there are many reasons to visit the city, including sampling its fabulous regional cuisine. Some of Puebla’s delectable dishes include their famous mole poblana sauce as well as the seasonal delicious dish of chiles en nogada. Additionally, the historic center of Puebla has been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Undoubtedly, one of the reasons for this honor is due to the absolutely stunning tile work that decorates the town’s historic colonial buildings.

Mexico has a rich and long history with producing ceramics, predating the arrival of the Spanish by several centuries. Stunning pre-Columbian artifacts from its many civilizations attest to this fact. The indigenous peoples of Mexico, long acquainted with making items from clay, had their own distinct method of producing earthenware, one which did not involve glazing or the use of the potter’s wheel.

Shortly after Puebla was founded in 1531, the Spanish feverishly began building churches, monasteries and convents. To decorate these buildings, craftsman from the city of Talavera de la Reina, located in Spain, were commissioned to come to the New World to produce fine tiles as well as other ceramic ware. In addition, these same craftsman were to teach the indigenous artisans their technique of Majolica pottery, in order to increase production levels.

The tradition that the Spanish craftsmen brought from Talavera de la Reina to the New World has a fascinating history. During the 8th century, the Moors from Northern Africa conquered Spain and with their arrival, the customary blending of cultures occurred. One such consequence was the introduction of Majolica pottery, an art form known for its beautiful glazes and intricate design work. A major component of Majolica is its glazing technique which contains tin as an ingredient. This particular type of glaze provides a creamy white background that is ideal for applying design.

Spanish craftsman from Talavera de la Reina embraced the techniques of Majolica and also added to the art form. Chinese and Italian influences were incorporated and guilds of craftsmanship, where strict adherence to technique were required, were formed. This dedication was brought from Spain to Mexico. Guilds were summarily established in Mexico with appropriate standards and regulations. The indigenous craftsmen incorporated their artistic heritage with the techniques of Majolica pottery. A beautiful marriage was formed between the old world and the new, and Puebla became the birthplace of an exquisite art form known as Talavera Poblana.

An elaborate process is involved in making a piece of Talavera pottery. First, comes the selection of the clay, which is chosen from the area of Puebla and nearby vicinities. The clay found in this region is known for its fine quality. After a detailed process of washing and soaking the clay, it is then hand-formed or shaped on a potter’s wheel into its desired form. Next, it is allowed to dry in the sun for a matter of days, after which it is fired at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. A test is performed at this point, making sure there are no cracks in the object. This is followed by an initial glazing process after which the hand-painted design is applied. This stage differs in length, dependent upon the intricacy of the design work involved. A final firing is performed. Before being offered for sell, a certification process is next on the agenda. This is to ensure that the piece meets regulations and the level of excellence in craftsmanship has been achieved. It is at this time, provided all conditions have been met, that the piece is stamped with the maker’s mark along with a registration number.

One characteristic of authentic Talavera pottery is the quality of detail in the painting, expertly applied. There is a raised appearance to the painted line, accompanied by a glossy sheen. Only natural earth pigments are used for the colors found in true Talavera. In its early days, the finest pottery was painted with a deep blue mineral, the most expensive pigment. This color motif, placed on the creamy white of the fired clay, was much sought after. It also provided a quality measure, reassuring the buyer that the piece they were purchasing was of the highest caliber. Other colors were introduced in 18th century, including yellow, green and mauve.

Today, when visiting the city of Puebla, you will be able to purchase authentic Talavera tiles, vases and dishes, along with many other fine Talavera objects. As well, you can see first-hand how Talavera tiles were used extensively in the decoration of the city’s historic churches, monasteries and ex-convents.

Article source: MexOnline.com

Centuries-Old Art of Making Talavera Pottery

MH461a - Talavera PlateSince its introduction by Spanish settlers in the 16th century, talavera pottery has become synonymous with Puebla. The beautifully hand-crafted ceramics, which take the form of everything from garden tiles to dinnerware, adorn building fronts in the historic center, replace china sets in Mexican households, and travel home with visitors as souvenirs. Talavera is so revered that President Calderón ordered a special bicentennial pattern last year for his Independence Day state dinner; Governor Rafael Moreno Valle buys centerpieces to give as personal gifts; and collectors worldwide seek out new and historical pieces to display as fine art.

The local tradition of making talavera started shortly after the city of Puebla was founded in 1531. “The Spanish feverishly began building churches, monasteries, and convents,” notes MexOnline.com. “To decorate these buildings, craftsman from Talavera de la Reina … were commissioned to come to the New World to produce fine tiles as well as other ceramic ware. In addition, these same craftsman were to teach the indigenous artisans their technique of Majolica pottery, in order to increase production levels.”

Nearly 500 years later, artisans continue to produce talavera in Puebla. In fact, the capital city is home to the longest continuously operating factory in Mexico and perhaps the world: Uriarte Talavera. Uriarte is one of the oldest businesses in the country, ranking in the top 10 behind José Cuervo’s tequila distillery in Jalisco and several other well-known enterprises.

Excerpt from Pueblo-Mexico.com

Applying Different Types Of Mexican Tile In Your Home

When decorating the inside of your home, it is a good idea to consider what decorative theme you plan on making prevalent throughout your home. Many different types of furnishings can be used to convey a certain message in the environment, with accessories such as lighting fixtures and wall-mounted furnishings further solidifying the theme. One of the most important aspects of the decoration process, however, is considering what type of floor you want to have present in the room. Because of how the floor can be seen as both the backdrop and the centerpiece of the room, it is a good idea to plan your floor first before purchasing other furnishings for the home. Tiles are perhaps one of the most widely recognized and aesthetically pleasing types of flooring options available, and Mexican tile in particular can be an extremely attractive option for homes that emphasize a more traditional and quaint design.

talavera_tilesTypical Mexican tiles are unique furnace-fired terracotta pieces of tile that can have a wider variety of colors, finishes, and designs, each of which can provide something unique for your home. Authentic Mexican tiles are typically hand-made at local kilns, fired at low temperatures to ensure a strong, reliable surface. What makes these tiles truly special is the potential for charming flaws that it may have when it is made by hand. Some Mexican tile designs may not be perfectly flat or perfectly square, and some may even feature imprints of animal tracks or debris, creating a truly old-world feeling in the home.

Saltillo tiles are typically the traditional Mexican ceramic tile, which features a wide variety of colors, such as varying hues of browns, beiges, oranges, yellows, and even reds. These festive colors make them ideal for homes that feature such a color scheme. The tile is named for the city from which the strong clay is mined. Another type of tile is the Talavera tile, which is the most decorative type of tile because of the wide variety of patterns that are typically painted on them. These tiles are given a glossy finish to further emphasize their decorative appeal. These types of tiles are often wall-mounted in conjunction with the aforementioned Saltillo tiles because of how well the two types complement each other. By carefully planning out the design of your home beforehand, and researching different types of furnishings that can go along with the backdrop, you will no doubt be able to create a warm, cozy environment that is sure to please.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diy-articles/applying-different-types-of-mexican-tile-in-your-home-6839202.html

 

Travelling Talavera Exhibits

Several temporary and travelling Talavera exhibits of certain themes have been created from these permanent collections. One of these was called “El Aguila en la Historia de Mexico” (The Eagle in the History of Mexico). The forty-two-piece exhibit was sponsored by the Senate of Mexico to show how the eagle symbol has been used in the country throughout its history. This exhibit was sponsored in honor of the Bicentennial of Independence in 2010. These ceramics were chosen because of their combination of art and utility. Eagles depicted include that of Mexico’s coat of arms, as well as those of political figures such as José María Morelos y Pavón and Porfirio Díaz, and those used by institutions such as the Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico and the Mexican Senate itself.

Authentic Talavera TileAnother exhibit in Mexico centered on the creation of maps using Talavera tile. Most tiles during the colonial period were decorated with flowers and landscapes but a significant number were painted to create murals with maps. Those that survive show how a number of cities developed over the colonial period. Eight of the most representative 16th-century Talavera tile maps were at the El Carmen Museum at an exhibit called “Cartografia: Una Vision en Talavera del Mexico Colonial” (Cartography: A Talavera Vision of Colonial Mexico). This exhibit was of reproductions of the originals created by the Talavera de la Luz workshop in Puebla. The chosen maps show the development of Mexico City as well as representations of the Acapulco, Puebla and the Tesuco regions during this time period.

Exhibits have been held outside of Mexico as well. The Museum of the Americas in Spain held an exhibit called “Talaveras de Puebla, Cerámica colonial Mexicana. Siglos XVII a XXI” (Talavera Pottery of Puebla, Mexican colonial ceramics, XVII to 21st centuries). This was a temporary exhibit of 49 pieces, combined with pieces from Spain and China as references. The pieces were loaned by the Franz Mayer Museum and the Bello Museum.

Talavera Museum Exhibitions

Talavera Plate by Studio La CupulaIn the early 20th century, interest developed in collecting the work. In 1904, an American by the name of Emily Johnston de Forrest discovered Talavera on a trip to Mexico. She became interested in collecting the works, so she consulted scholars, local collectors and dealers. Eventually, her collection became the base of what is currently exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Her enthusiasm was passed onto Edwin Atlee Barber, the curator of the Pennsylvania Museum of Art. He, too, spent time in Mexico and introduced Talavera into the Pennsylvania museum’s collection. He studied the major stylistic periods and how to distinguish the best examples, publishing a guide in 1908 which is still considered authoritative.

During this time period, important museum collections were being assembled in Mexico as well. One of the earliest and most important was the collection of Francisco Perez Salazer in Mexico City. A bit later, in the 1920s, Franz Mayer, a German-born stockbroker, started his collection. In Puebla, he was considered a bit crazy for buying all of the “old stuff” from the locals. In 1986, the Franz Mayer Museum opened in Mexico City with the largest collection of Talavera Poblana in the world – 726 pieces from the 17th through the 19th century, and some 20th-century pieces by Enrique Luis Ventosa. In Puebla, José Luis Bello y González and his son José Mariano Bello y Acedo sought the advice of Ventosa in starting their collection. They amassed the largest and most important collection in the city which now is housed in the José Luis Bello y González Museum (Bello Museum).

More recently, the Museo de la Talavera (Talavera Museum) has been established in the city of Puebla, with an initial collection of 400 pieces. The museum is dedicated to recounting the origins, history, expansions and variations in the craft. Pieces include some of the simplest and most complex, as well as those representing different eras.

Talavera History

Talavera plates made in Pueblo, MexicoTechniques and designs of Islamic pottery were brought to Spain by the Moors by the end of the 12th century as Hispano-Moresque ware. From there they influenced late medieval pottery in the rest of Spain and Europe, under the name majolica.[5][15] Spanish craftsmen fromTalavera de la Reina (Castile, Spain) adopted and added to the art form. Further Italian influences were incorporated as the craft evolved in Spain, and guilds were formed to regulate the quality.

During roughly the same time period, pre-Hispanic cultures had their own tradition of pottery and ceramics, but they did not involve a potter’s wheel or glazing.  There are several theories as to how majolica pottery was introduced to Mexico. The most common and accepted theory is that it was introduced by monks who either sent for artisans from Spain or knew how to produce the ceramics themselves. These monks wanted tiles and other objects to decorate their new monasteries, so to keep up with this demand, either Spanish artists or the monks taught indigenous artists to produce the glazed pottery.  A significant number of secular potters came to Mexico from Seville and Talavera de la Reina, Spain during the very early colonial period. Later a notable potter by the name of Diego Gaytán, who was a native of Talavera, made an impact on pottery after he arrived in Puebla.

From the time that the city of Puebla was founded in 1531, a large number of churches and monasteries were being built. The demand for tiles to decorate these buildings plus the availability of high-quality clay in the area gave rise to the ceramic industry. It was soon produced by indigenous people as well as Spanish craftsmen, which resulted in a mixture of influences, especially in decorative design. The new tradition came to be known as Talavera Poblana to distinguish it from that of Talavera pottery from Spain.[2][6] By 1550, the city of Puebla was producing high-quality Talavera wares and, by 1580, it had become the center of Talavera production in Mexico.[5]

From 1580 to the mid-17th century, the number of potters and workshops kept growing, each having their own designs and techniques. The colonial government decided to regulate the industry with guilds and standards. In 1653, the first ordinances were passed. These regulated who could be called a craftsman, the categories of product quality, and norms of decoration.[14] The effect was to standardize the production of ceramics and increase the quality of what was produced. Some of the rules established by the ordinances included the use of blue cobalt on only the finest, quality pieces, the marking of pieces by craftsmen to avoid counterfeits, the creation of categories of quality (fine, semi-fine and daily use), and yearly inspections and examination of master potters.[1]

Talavera Snack Tray by Studio Tomas HuertaThe period between 1650 and 1750 was known as the Golden Age of Talavera. Puebla became the most important earthenware center of New Spain. Pieces were shipped all over the territory, and were sent to Guatemala, Cuba, Santo Domingo, Venezuela and Colombia. During this time, the preferred use of blue on Talavera pottery was reinforced by the influence of China’s Ming dynasty through imported Chinese ceramics that came to Mexico via the Manila galleons. Italian influences in the 18th century introduced the use of other colors.

During the Mexican War of Independence, the potters’ guild and the ordinances of the 17th century were abolished. This allowed anyone to make the ceramic in any way, leading to a decline in quality.The war disrupted trade among the Spanish colonies and cheaper English porcelain was being imported.  The Talavera market crashed. Out of the forty-six workshops that were producing in the 18th century, only seven remained after the war.

In 1897, a Catalan by the name of Enrique Luis Ventosa arrived to Puebla. Ventosa was fascinated by the history of the craft which was unique from other art forms in Mexico. He studied the original processes and combined it with his knowledge of contemporary, Spanish work. He published articles and poems about the tradition and worked to decorate ceramic pieces. In 1922, he befriended Ysauro Uriarte Martinez, a young potter, who had inherited his grandfather’s workshop. The two men collaborated to create new decorative designs, adding pre-Columbian and Art nouveau influences to the Islamic, Chinese, Spanish and Italian influences that were already present. They also worked to restore the former levels of quality. Their timing was good as the Mexican Revolution had ended and the country was in a period of reconstruction.

However, by the 1980s, there had been a further decline in the number of workshops until only four remained. Talavera had been under pressure in the latter part of the 20th century because of competition from pottery made in other Mexican states, cheap imports and the lack of more modern and imaginative designs.[4] In the early 1990s, the Talavera de la Reina workshop began revitalizing the craft by inviting artists to work with their artisans to create new pieces and new decorative designs. Among the artists wereJuan Soriano, Vicente Rojo Almazán, Javier Marín, Gustavo Pérez, Magali Lara and Francisco Toledo.  They did not change the ceramic processes, but added human forms, animals, other items and traditional images of flowers to the designs.

Since then there has been some resurgence in the craft. In the 2000s, seventeen workshops were producing Talavera in the old tradition. Eight were in the process of becoming certified. These workshops employed about 250 workers and exported their wares to the United States, Canada, South America and Europe.

Although the Spaniards introduced this type of pottery, ironically the term Talavera is used much more in Mexico than in Talavera de la Reina, Spain, its namesake.  In 1997, the Denominación de Origin de la Talavera was established to regulate what pieces could be officially called Talavera. Requisites included the city of production, the clay that was used, and the manufacturing methods. These pieces now carry holograms.  One of the reasons the federal law was passed was that the remaining Talavera workshops had maintained the high quality and crafting process from the early colonial period, and the goal was to protect the tradition.

However, the tradition still struggles. Angelica Moreno, owner of Talavera de la Reina, is concerned that the tradition of the craft is waning, despite her workshop’s efforts. One problem the craft faces is the lack of young people who are interested in learning it. An artisan earns about 700 to 800 pesos a week, which is not enough to meet expenses.